The Great Story Maker

The Great Story Maker

David and Goliath.

Moses and the Red Sea.

Joshua and Jericho.

The Bible contains some of the greatest stories ever told. Even non-Christians know these stories and have been impressed by the drama and characters. It’s easy to think of the people in the stories as heroic, larger than life -- even super-human. Their stories can become fairytales without recognizing how human each person in the Bible actually was.

We are told that the great prophet Elijah was a man just like us (James 5:17), but do we really believe that? Wasn’t there just something special about him that allowed him to do all the great and astonishing things he did? Something that we don’t have?

Even the Rocks Will Cry Out

Even the Rocks Will Cry Out

It was springtime and the women from our church in Connecticut were heading out to our annual retreat by the sea. The speaker, a dear friend of mine, wanted to teach the women how to listen to God’s voice by waiting before Him in silence. This would be new territory for many of the women, including me. Oh sure, I had heard the voice of God before, but it usually came as an interjection in the midst of my incessant self-talk. External silence was easy enough. Internal silence? Nearly impossible.

 

In Surrender, Strength

In Surrender, Strength

When my children were young, and I was more than a little bit overwhelmed with being their mom, people used to say to me, “Enjoy it! It will be over before you know it.” On my worst days, the thought in the back of my head was, “Yeah? It can’t be over soon enough!” Of course I didn’t mean that, but in those early stages of motherhood I was often so exhausted and full of self-doubt that I had trouble accessing “enjoyment” in the moment. I got better at it and eventually found being a mom one of the most rewarding and enjoyable experiences of my life.

Now the “home phase” of parenting is over...

Our Dwelling Place

Our Dwelling Place

Psalm 91 is a favorite for many of us. In the second portion, the psalmist talks about making the Most High our dwelling place. If we do so, he promises us protection, at the hands of angels, from disaster and from those malevolent forces (here described as a lion and a cobra) that come against us. But how do we make God our dwelling place? In what sense will this make us "disaster-proof"? How will the angels lift us up? And what does the psalmist actually mean when he says we will trample on both the lion and the cobra? These questions intrigued me as I meditated on the passage recently ...  

Praying Romans

Praying Romans

Anyone ever have trouble concentrating or finding the right words to say when you sit down to pray?

Me too.

However, I’ve learned a very good method of fighting the distractions, the wandering thoughts, and even the unbelief and hopelessness that try to keep me from prayer...

(Work)Place of Worship

(Work)Place of Worship

Recently, I woke up with Francesca Battistelli’s song, Holy Spirit, playing in my head. It continued as I brushed my teeth and traveled with me during my morning commute. It followed me into my office building, rode quietly up the elevator, and hovered over my desk all morning. Even as I composed emails and filed papers, it wouldn’t go away...